• In this classic historical text on hospitals - featuring a foreword by the Florence Nightingale Museum - Nightingale reveals her passion for good hospital architecture and design. At Scutari she saw first hand the harm which can be caused by inadequate and poorly-designed hospital buildings. Nightingale openly criticised designs which she thought might lead to higher infection rates, and therefore patients deaths, Florence Nightingale, keen to increase the range of employment open to women, spent time visiting hospitals in Europe, studying their methods of training nurses, before she was herself trained at Kaiserswerth in 1851. During the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale's quiet determination in tackling the problems in the face of a deep-rooted military establishment, as well as her understanding of the spiritual and physical needs of the wounded soldiers and their families, won her great acclaim and an international reputation as 'The Lady with the Lamp'. Reports of Florence Nightingale's findings and suggestions had a profound effect on the medical community and re-established her as an international healthcare authority. Published in conjunction with the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work. 
  • In this classic historical nursing text, first published in 1859, Nightingale wrote '...nothing but observation and experience will teach us the ways to maintain or to bring back the state of health'. The guidance Nightingale wrote of includes such practicalities as ventilation, heating, noise, light, bedding and the cleanliness of the patient's environment, as well as a nurse's personal cleanliness and methods of observation. The pioneering work of Florence Nightingale and her effort to structure the care of the unwell has since earned her recognition as one of the world's founders of modern nursing. Over 160 years later, the observations of the sick by Florence Nightingale are astonishingly similar, which is why Notes on Nursing is as practical as it is captivating. Whether you are a student nurse or experienced nurse, or simply caring for the infirm, this book stands the test of time and maintains its innovativeness. Florence is remembered as the founder of modern nursing, but she was so much more; a female icon in her own lifetime, a healthcare pioneer, an influential statistician, a trailblazer and a leader. And her legacy still lives on today. Published in conjunction with - and including a foreword by - the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the work of the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.   
  • Our exclusive 2020 bicentenary range has been designed exclusively for us by Alison Gardiner. The range features different nurses from Florence through to a modern day nurse and reflects the changes that have been made to nursing. This magnetic bookmark features four of the figures from the overall design, including Florence, with the Nightingale Training School badge on the reverse. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • This postcard shows nursing from Nightingale through to today in six figures. Postcard designed by Alison Gardiner. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Our Nurses range has been designed for us by Alison Gardiner. The range features different nurses from Florence through to a modern day nurse and reflects the changes that have been made to nursing. The tea towels are printed and hand finished in Lancashire, England. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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    A History of Nursing explores the history of nursing by investigating the earliest records of the caring profession, how it progressed and what established it along the way to becoming the nursing we see today. It starts at the beginning of the story -? how, once upon a time, all we had to depend on was Mother Nature. Over time, education and standards improved for the safety, development and governance of the profession. Not everything was plain sailing and the book introduces lesser-known people who made this possible, sometimes at great cost to themselves, and the effect military nursing had on the nineteenth century in turning nursing from religious principles to the secular standards we see today. How did nursing go from being knowledge handed down through ancient scripts, folklore and sometimes by accident, to the degree-level, accountable practice of modern times? And why do nurses not wear hats anymore? A History of Nursing answers all these questions and more.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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    3D paper folding figure of Florence Nightingale All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Comprehensive biography about Florence, written by Mark Bostridge
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    Discover all the places in London associated with Florence with this beautiful map. Exclusively hand drawn and printed in Kent, England for the Florence Nightingale Museum by Have A Gander.   Available in two sizes.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.  
  • Paperback edition of Florence Nightingale: A Very Brief History by Lynn McDonald
  • The Nightingale Training School opened its doors in July 1860 at St. Thomas' Hospital. All probationers need to read and write and be able to learn at least some rudimentary Latin to administer medicines. The Nightingale approach to training focused on dedication and discipline. This tea towel features the Regulations, dating from 1860, that the probationers would have had to have followed. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, at its work.
  • Nurses and nursing are firmly rooted in Britain's heritage, for the profession as we know it today owes much to the pioneering work of Florence Nightingale. Before she helped the establish the first nurse training school in Liverpool in the late 1800s, the women who looked after the sick were a motley mix. The role of the nurse has developed from the untrained handywoman and private nurse, through the early nurses who acted as 'health missioners', to the highly trained professionals we recognise today. Nurse training has evolved to reflect the advances in medical treatment and nurses have been able to engage more widely with the community by undergoing additional training as, for example, district nurse, school nurses, midwives, health visitors and mental health nurses. During both world wars, nurses made a special contribution on the home front and overseas. Using first-hand accounts from nurses through the ages, Susan Cohen takes us on a nostalgic journey through the history of nurses and nursing in Britain, from the pre-Nightingale days through to the post-NHS era.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.

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