• Sterling silver earrings in the shape of a heart with a heartbeat running through the middle. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • A humorous, snarky & unique adult colouring book for registered nurses, nurse practitioners and nursing students. For stress relief and relaxtion.
  • Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical text on hospitals - featuring a foreword by the Florence Nightingale Museum - Nightingale reveals her passion for good hospital architecture and design. At Scutari she saw first hand the harm which can be caused by inadequate and poorly-designed hospital buildings. Nightingale openly criticised designs which she thought might lead to higher infection rates, and therefore patients deaths, Florence Nightingale, keen to increase the range of employment open to women, spent time visiting hospitals in Europe, studying their methods of training nurses, before she was herself trained at Kaiserswerth in 1851. During the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale's quiet determination in tackling the problems in the face of a deep-rooted military establishment, as well as her understanding of the spiritual and physical needs of the wounded soldiers and their families, won her great acclaim and an international reputation as 'The Lady with the Lamp'. Reports of Florence Nightingale's findings and suggestions had a profound effect on the medical community and re-established her as an international healthcare authority. Published in conjunction with the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work. 
  • The hand of a stranger offered in solace. A flower placed on a dead body as a mark of respect. A gentle word in response to fear and anger. It is these moments of empathy, in the extremis of human experience, that define us as people. Nobody knows this better than a nurse and Molly Case has witnessed countless such moments. In?How to Treat People,?she documents these extraordinary points, when two people truly connect. In rich, lyrical prose, she introduces us to patients with whom we share the pain, but also the experience of illness when life is at its most vivid. And when her father is admitted to the high dependency unit on which she works, Molly confronts care in a whole new way, when two worlds - the professional and the personal - suddenly collide. Weaving together medical history, art, memoir and science,?How to Treat People?beautifully illustrates the intricacies of the human condition and the oscillating rhythms of life and death. Most of all, it is the heart-stopping reminder that we can all find meaning in being part, even for a moment, of the lives of others.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Edited by Ruth Cown and foreword by Michael Morpurgo. Edith Appleton, known as Edie, was working as a professional nurse when war broke out in 1914. She immediately joined the military nursing services and spent the next four years treating dying and injured allied soldiers in France and Belgium, as they fought an entirely new type of war: one of horrendous living conditions, gas attacks and shell-shocked survivors. A Nurse at the Front contains the fascinating diaries Edie kept of her experiences. Surrounded by death, she never lost her appreciation of life. Against the background of Ypres and the Somme, Edie writes unflinchingly, with clarity and even wit. We see the Great War through a new set of eyes in an acutely observed, courageous account of life on the front line of treacherous warfare.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it?s work.
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