• Small charm in the shape of a blood bag featuring the different blood types. Ideal for attaching to your bag, phone or keys!   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • 97-hour weeks. Life and death decisions. A constant tsunami of bodily fluids. And the hospital parking meter earns more than you. Welcome to the life of a junior doctor. Scribbled in secret after endless days, sleepless nights and missed weekends, Adam Kay?s dairies provide a no-holds-barred account of his time on the NHS front line. Hilarious, horrifying and heartbreaking, this is everything you wanted to know - and more than a few things you didn?t - about life on and off the hospital ward.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
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    These socks are a must have for any nurse or medical professional. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Out of stock
    These meds socks are a great gift idea for any nurse or medical professional! All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work  
  • Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical nursing text, first published in 1859, Nightingale wrote '...nothing but observation and experience will teach us the ways to maintain or to bring back the state of health'. The guidance Nightingale wrote of includes such practicalities as ventilation, heating, noise, light, bedding and the cleanliness of the patient's environment, as well as a nurse's personal cleanliness and methods of observation. The pioneering work of Florence Nightingale and her effort to structure the care of the unwell has since earned her recognition as one of the world's founders of modern nursing. Over 160 years later, the observations of the sick by Florence Nightingale are astonishingly similar, which is why Notes on Nursing is as practical as it is captivating. Whether you are a student nurse or experienced nurse, or simply caring for the infirm, this book stands the test of time and maintains its innovativeness. Florence is remembered as the founder of modern nursing, but she was so much more; a female icon in her own lifetime, a healthcare pioneer, an influential statistician, a trailblazer and a leader. And her legacy still lives on today. Published in conjunction with - and including a foreword by - the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the work of the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.   
  • The Bristol Stool Chart was created at the Bristol Royal Infirmary to divide human stools into seven categories as a form of clinical assessment. This humorous mug featuring the Bristol Stool chart would make a great gift for a doctor or nurse. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Is Medicine Still Good For Us? The sophistication of modern medicine is an exceptional feat in which many of us benefit from unpredcidented levels of care. Yet medical progress comes at a price: resistance to anti-biotics, ever-mutating superbugs and the unintended yet devasating consequence of prescribing opiates are all part of today's medical landscape. Is the natural human experience being over 'medicalized' as we seek pharmaceutical remedies for every kind of suffering? Are its astronomical costs furthering global inequality? Where has modern medicine failed us and how does it need to change? This inclusive volumes interogates the economics and ethics of modern practices and the impact they have on our lives.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • A History of Nursing explores the history of nursing by investigating the earliest records of the caring profession, how it progressed and what established it along the way to becoming the nursing we see today. It starts at the beginning of the story -? how, once upon a time, all we had to depend on was Mother Nature. Over time, education and standards improved for the safety, development and governance of the profession. Not everything was plain sailing and the book introduces lesser-known people who made this possible, sometimes at great cost to themselves, and the effect military nursing had on the nineteenth century in turning nursing from religious principles to the secular standards we see today. How did nursing go from being knowledge handed down through ancient scripts, folklore and sometimes by accident, to the degree-level, accountable practice of modern times? And why do nurses not wear hats anymore? A History of Nursing answers all these questions and more.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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    This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • Asclepius was the Greek god of medicine and his staff or rod intertwined with the snake has become a symbol for medicine and healthcare. This silver brooch can be worn with pride by anyone within the medical profession. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Asclepius was the Greek god of medicine and his staff or rod intertwined with the snake has become a symbol for medicine and healthcare. These silver earrings would make a great gift for anyone in the medical profession. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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