• Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical text on hospitals - featuring a foreword by the Florence Nightingale Museum - Nightingale reveals her passion for good hospital architecture and design. At Scutari she saw first hand the harm which can be caused by inadequate and poorly-designed hospital buildings. Nightingale openly criticised designs which she thought might lead to higher infection rates, and therefore patients deaths, Florence Nightingale, keen to increase the range of employment open to women, spent time visiting hospitals in Europe, studying their methods of training nurses, before she was herself trained at Kaiserswerth in 1851. During the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale's quiet determination in tackling the problems in the face of a deep-rooted military establishment, as well as her understanding of the spiritual and physical needs of the wounded soldiers and their families, won her great acclaim and an international reputation as 'The Lady with the Lamp'. Reports of Florence Nightingale's findings and suggestions had a profound effect on the medical community and re-established her as an international healthcare authority. Published in conjunction with the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work. 
  • Sale!
    This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • Sale!
    A guide to Florence's life and work by Kirsteen Nixon.
  • The Nightingale Training School opened its doors in July 1860 at St. Thomas' Hospital. All probationers need to read and write and be able to learn at least some rudimentary Latin to administer medicines. The Nightingale approach to training focused on dedication and discipline. This tea towel features the Regulations, dating from 1860, that the probationers would have had to have followed. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, at its work.
  • Nurses and nursing are firmly rooted in Britain's heritage, for the profession as we know it today owes much to the pioneering work of Florence Nightingale. Before she helped the establish the first nurse training school in Liverpool in the late 1800s, the women who looked after the sick were a motley mix. The role of the nurse has developed from the untrained handywoman and private nurse, through the early nurses who acted as 'health missioners', to the highly trained professionals we recognise today. Nurse training has evolved to reflect the advances in medical treatment and nurses have been able to engage more widely with the community by undergoing additional training as, for example, district nurse, school nurses, midwives, health visitors and mental health nurses. During both world wars, nurses made a special contribution on the home front and overseas. Using first-hand accounts from nurses through the ages, Susan Cohen takes us on a nostalgic journey through the history of nurses and nursing in Britain, from the pre-Nightingale days through to the post-NHS era.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Black ink pen, featuring a floating Florence, walking up and down the wards of Scutari Hospital while holding her lamp. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • This painted and leaded glass lancet window panel was discovered in store in Guy's Hospital in 2017. The glass panel may have come from Riddel House- a nurse's home established for St. Thomas' Hospital and the Nightingale Training School. This glass portrait of Florence may have been the only surviving treasure from the home. The panel dates from the early 20th Century and is on display in the museum. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • 97-hour weeks. Life and death decisions. A constant tsunami of bodily fluids. And the hospital parking meter earns more than you. Welcome to the life of a junior doctor. Scribbled in secret after endless days, sleepless nights and missed weekends, Adam Kay?s dairies provide a no-holds-barred account of his time on the NHS front line. Hilarious, horrifying and heartbreaking, this is everything you wanted to know - and more than a few things you didn?t - about life on and off the hospital ward.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Written by Kate Cunningham and illustrated by Sam Cunningham. In 1854 Vlad the flea and Loxton the rat were enjoying the rotten food and dirt in Scutari Hospital. Their lives were turned upside down by the arrival of Florence Nightingale and her tortoise Jimmy. They know a lot about Florence and her work, but how much do you know? Find out about Florence Nightingale through puzzles and games and learn how to people with basic first aid skills. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
Go to Top