• Written by Lucy Lethbridge and illustrated by Karen Donnelly. Born into a wealthy family, Florence Nightingale could have lived a life of leisure and luxury. Instead she longed to be a nurse. In 1830, that was the last thing a rich girl could do - but Florence was no ordinary girl. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • If you are a teacher or a parent whose child is learning about Florence, then this pack is for you! Based around the KS1 curriculum, this pack gives a good basis for learning all about Florence and the work she did in the classroom and at home. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Paperback edition of Florence Nightingale: A Very Brief History by Lynn McDonald
  • Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical text on hospitals - featuring a foreword by the Florence Nightingale Museum - Nightingale reveals her passion for good hospital architecture and design. At Scutari she saw first hand the harm which can be caused by inadequate and poorly-designed hospital buildings. Nightingale openly criticised designs which she thought might lead to higher infection rates, and therefore patients deaths, Florence Nightingale, keen to increase the range of employment open to women, spent time visiting hospitals in Europe, studying their methods of training nurses, before she was herself trained at Kaiserswerth in 1851. During the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale's quiet determination in tackling the problems in the face of a deep-rooted military establishment, as well as her understanding of the spiritual and physical needs of the wounded soldiers and their families, won her great acclaim and an international reputation as 'The Lady with the Lamp'. Reports of Florence Nightingale's findings and suggestions had a profound effect on the medical community and re-established her as an international healthcare authority. Published in conjunction with the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work. 
  • Sale!
    This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • Do you want to know more about the fight for women?s rights, what we?ve achieved and how we got there? This helpful little guide will teach you the history, theory, big issues and everything you need to know to become a card-carrying feminist.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Have you ever wondered why history books are full of men? And what women were doing at the time? Women: Our History surveys the lives of women across centuries and continents. It examines the often overlooked roles they played, and brings you face to face with the pioneers and rule-breakers who dared to be different. From warrior queens to astronauts, women?s suffrage to the sexual revolution, this is the other side of history. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Crimea

    £12.99
    by Orlando Figes The Crimean War one of the fiercest battles in Russia's history, killing nearly a million men and completely redrawing the map of Europe. Pitting the Tsar's empire against an alliance of Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire, it was the first conflict to use photography, the telegraph and newspapers; a war over territory, from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf; a war of religion, driven by a fervent, populist belief by the Tsar and his ministers that it was Russia's task to rule all Orthodox Christians and control the Holy Land; it was the original 'total war'. Orlando Figes' vivid new book reinterprets this extraordinary conflict. Bringing to life ordinary soldiers in snow-filled trenches, surgeons on the battlefield and the haunted, fanatical figure of Tsar Nicholas himself, Crimea tells the human story of a tragic war. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it's work.
Go to Top