• A lasting memory of your visit to the Florence Nightingale or a taster before you visit!
  • Paperback edition of Florence Nightingale: A Very Brief History by Lynn McDonald
  • A History of Nursing explores the history of nursing by investigating the earliest records of the caring profession, how it progressed and what established it along the way to becoming the nursing we see today. It starts at the beginning of the story -? how, once upon a time, all we had to depend on was Mother Nature. Over time, education and standards improved for the safety, development and governance of the profession. Not everything was plain sailing and the book introduces lesser-known people who made this possible, sometimes at great cost to themselves, and the effect military nursing had on the nineteenth century in turning nursing from religious principles to the secular standards we see today. How did nursing go from being knowledge handed down through ancient scripts, folklore and sometimes by accident, to the degree-level, accountable practice of modern times? And why do nurses not wear hats anymore? A History of Nursing answers all these questions and more.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Do you hesitate about putting forward ideas? Are you reluctant to claim credit for your achievements? Do you find it difficult to get the support you need from your boss or the recognition you deserve from your colleagues? If your answer to any of these is 'yes', How Women Rise will help you get back on track. Inspiring and practical by turns, it identifies twelve common habits that can prove an obstacle to future success and tells you how to overcome them. In the process, it points the way to a career that will satisfy your ambitions and help you make the difference you want to make in the world.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • From the medicine we take to the cars we drive, the clothes we wear adn even the beer we drink, statistics hae given shape to the world we inhabit. However, for the media, statistics are routinely 'damning', 'horrifying' or, occasionally, 'encouraging'. Exploring the history, mathematics, philosophy and practical use of statistics, Eillen Magnello - with the help of Borin Van Loon's deft illustration - traces the rise of statistics from the ancient Babylonians, Egyptians and Chinese, to the censuses of the Romans and the Greeks, and the modern emergence of the term itself in Europe. They explore the English Victorians such ass William Farr who created the modern discipline of vital statistics, and Francis Galton, W. F. R. Weldon and Karl Pearson who established the fundamentally different modern discipline of mathematical statistics. Introducing Statistics is an enjoyable, suprise-filled tour through a subject that is both fascinating, and crucial to understanding our world.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Crimea

    £12.99
    by Orlando Figes The Crimean War one of the fiercest battles in Russia's history, killing nearly a million men and completely redrawing the map of Europe. Pitting the Tsar's empire against an alliance of Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire, it was the first conflict to use photography, the telegraph and newspapers; a war over territory, from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf; a war of religion, driven by a fervent, populist belief by the Tsar and his ministers that it was Russia's task to rule all Orthodox Christians and control the Holy Land; it was the original 'total war'. Orlando Figes' vivid new book reinterprets this extraordinary conflict. Bringing to life ordinary soldiers in snow-filled trenches, surgeons on the battlefield and the haunted, fanatical figure of Tsar Nicholas himself, Crimea tells the human story of a tragic war. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it's work.
  • Written by Lucy Lethbridge and illustrated by Karen Donnelly. Born into a wealthy family, Florence Nightingale could have lived a life of leisure and luxury. Instead she longed to be a nurse. In 1830, that was the last thing a rich girl could do - but Florence was no ordinary girl. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Mary was a brave nurse. When a war started in the Crimea, she sails far across the sea to offer her help. Can she save the soldiers, even when the bullets at flying? All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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