• A humorous, snarky & unique adult colouring book for registered nurses, nurse practitioners and nursing students. For stress relief and relaxtion.
  • Nurses and nursing are firmly rooted in Britain's heritage, for the profession as we know it today owes much to the pioneering work of Florence Nightingale. Before she helped the establish the first nurse training school in Liverpool in the late 1800s, the women who looked after the sick were a motley mix. The role of the nurse has developed from the untrained handywoman and private nurse, through the early nurses who acted as 'health missioners', to the highly trained professionals we recognise today. Nurse training has evolved to reflect the advances in medical treatment and nurses have been able to engage more widely with the community by undergoing additional training as, for example, district nurse, school nurses, midwives, health visitors and mental health nurses. During both world wars, nurses made a special contribution on the home front and overseas. Using first-hand accounts from nurses through the ages, Susan Cohen takes us on a nostalgic journey through the history of nurses and nursing in Britain, from the pre-Nightingale days through to the post-NHS era.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Christine Watson was a nurse for twenty years. Taking us from birth to death, from A&E to the mortuary, here is her astonishing, heartwarming account of a professional defined by acts of car, compassion and kindness.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightignale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Do you want to know more about the fight for women?s rights, what we?ve achieved and how we got there? This helpful little guide will teach you the history, theory, big issues and everything you need to know to become a card-carrying feminist.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • 97-hour weeks. Life and death decisions. A constant tsunami of bodily fluids. And the hospital parking meter earns more than you. Welcome to the life of a junior doctor. Scribbled in secret after endless days, sleepless nights and missed weekends, Adam Kay?s dairies provide a no-holds-barred account of his time on the NHS front line. Hilarious, horrifying and heartbreaking, this is everything you wanted to know - and more than a few things you didn?t - about life on and off the hospital ward.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • Have you ever wondered why history books are full of men? And what women were doing at the time? Women: Our History surveys the lives of women across centuries and continents. It examines the often overlooked roles they played, and brings you face to face with the pioneers and rule-breakers who dared to be different. From warrior queens to astronauts, women?s suffrage to the sexual revolution, this is the other side of history. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • First published 1857, this autobiography explores the many adventures of Mary Seacole
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