• The hand of a stranger offered in solace. A flower placed on a dead body as a mark of respect. A gentle word in response to fear and anger. It is these moments of empathy, in the extremis of human experience, that define us as people. Nobody knows this better than a nurse and Molly Case has witnessed countless such moments. In?How to Treat People,?she documents these extraordinary points, when two people truly connect. In rich, lyrical prose, she introduces us to patients with whom we share the pain, but also the experience of illness when life is at its most vivid. And when her father is admitted to the high dependency unit on which she works, Molly confronts care in a whole new way, when two worlds - the professional and the personal - suddenly collide. Weaving together medical history, art, memoir and science,?How to Treat People?beautifully illustrates the intricacies of the human condition and the oscillating rhythms of life and death. Most of all, it is the heart-stopping reminder that we can all find meaning in being part, even for a moment, of the lives of others.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Florence Nightingale is known as 'The Lady with the Lamp', who travelled to Scutari to nurse the soldiers fighting in the Crimean War. But she stayed there less than two years, she spent more than half her life in London, and she lived until the age of 90. So, what else did she do, and where else did she go? Why did Florence's father change his name to Nightingale? Who found Athena the Owl in Mayfair? How many nurses went with Florence to Scutari? Was Florence married? Where did Florence buy her perfume? Did Florence ever go to India? What and where is the Nightingale Jewel? With this book you will be able to discover the answers to these questions and many more.
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    This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • Florence Nightingale is one of the most famous figures in modern history. Yet much of what we know of her emanates from unreliable second-hand accounts and from a mid-reading of the primary sources.?Florence Nightingale at First Hand,?by Lynn McDonald, editor of Nightingale?s Collected Works and the world?s foremost Nightingale authority, aims to put this right. This is a book that reports what Florence Nightingale said and did, based on her writing, of which a massive amount survives, scattered in over two hundred archives throughout the world. Published to commemorate the centenary of Nightingale?s death, McDonald?s study presents a Florence Nightingale for the twenty-first century, as an author of great style and wit, a systems thinker and pioneering public health reformer - the heroine and nurse were only the start.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Have you ever wondered why history books are full of men? And what women were doing at the time? Women: Our History surveys the lives of women across centuries and continents. It examines the often overlooked roles they played, and brings you face to face with the pioneers and rule-breakers who dared to be different. From warrior queens to astronauts, women?s suffrage to the sexual revolution, this is the other side of history. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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