• Paperback edition of Florence Nightingale: A Very Brief History by Lynn McDonald
  • From delicate floral notes to crisp citrus bites, gin remains a perennial favourite of cocktail-sippers everywhere. Originally a centuries old medicinal elixir, the brilliantly botanical spirit is much more than tonic's sidekick. Today's gin is sophisticatedly sippable, adding depth and flavour to any drink. This beautifully illustrated book will introduce you to a host of cocktails, from the classic to the cutting edge, showcasing the versatile potential of gin. In Gin Made Me Do It, gin aficionado and cocktail maven Jassy Davis explains everything you need to know: how to choose the right type, mix the ultimate martini and deliver delicious cocktails for every occasion. Add elegance to your evenings with the perfect G&T or an updated classic like the Aviation or Vesper, or if you're feeling adventurous, sip on Yuzu Sours, Shooting Stars, Salty Sea Dogs and many more gin-spirational treats. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical nursing text, first published in 1859, Nightingale wrote '...nothing but observation and experience will teach us the ways to maintain or to bring back the state of health'. The guidance Nightingale wrote of includes such practicalities as ventilation, heating, noise, light, bedding and the cleanliness of the patient's environment, as well as a nurse's personal cleanliness and methods of observation. The pioneering work of Florence Nightingale and her effort to structure the care of the unwell has since earned her recognition as one of the world's founders of modern nursing. Over 160 years later, the observations of the sick by Florence Nightingale are astonishingly similar, which is why Notes on Nursing is as practical as it is captivating. Whether you are a student nurse or experienced nurse, or simply caring for the infirm, this book stands the test of time and maintains its innovativeness. Florence is remembered as the founder of modern nursing, but she was so much more; a female icon in her own lifetime, a healthcare pioneer, an influential statistician, a trailblazer and a leader. And her legacy still lives on today. Published in conjunction with - and including a foreword by - the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the work of the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.   
  • Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical text on hospitals - featuring a foreword by the Florence Nightingale Museum - Nightingale reveals her passion for good hospital architecture and design. At Scutari she saw first hand the harm which can be caused by inadequate and poorly-designed hospital buildings. Nightingale openly criticised designs which she thought might lead to higher infection rates, and therefore patients deaths, Florence Nightingale, keen to increase the range of employment open to women, spent time visiting hospitals in Europe, studying their methods of training nurses, before she was herself trained at Kaiserswerth in 1851. During the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale's quiet determination in tackling the problems in the face of a deep-rooted military establishment, as well as her understanding of the spiritual and physical needs of the wounded soldiers and their families, won her great acclaim and an international reputation as 'The Lady with the Lamp'. Reports of Florence Nightingale's findings and suggestions had a profound effect on the medical community and re-established her as an international healthcare authority. Published in conjunction with the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work. 
  • Meet Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. Growing up in an upper-class family, it was expected that Florence would find a husband and live a life of luxury—but that kind of life wasn’t for her. Her calling was caring for the sick and the poor, so she followed her passion with her whole heart and trained to be a nurse. When war broke out, Florence travelled to nurse wounded soldiers but found that the hospitals were so dirty that they were making people ill! This experience inspired her to lead a healthcare revolution, and she became the mother of modern nursing, introducing care practices still followed today. This inspiring book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the social reformer’s life.
  • Comprehensive biography about Florence, written by Mark Bostridge
  • Crimea

    £12.99
    by Orlando Figes The Crimean War one of the fiercest battles in Russia's history, killing nearly a million men and completely redrawing the map of Europe. Pitting the Tsar's empire against an alliance of Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire, it was the first conflict to use photography, the telegraph and newspapers; a war over territory, from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf; a war of religion, driven by a fervent, populist belief by the Tsar and his ministers that it was Russia's task to rule all Orthodox Christians and control the Holy Land; it was the original 'total war'. Orlando Figes' vivid new book reinterprets this extraordinary conflict. Bringing to life ordinary soldiers in snow-filled trenches, surgeons on the battlefield and the haunted, fanatical figure of Tsar Nicholas himself, Crimea tells the human story of a tragic war. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it's work.
  • A humorous, snarky & unique adult colouring book for registered nurses, nurse practitioners and nursing students. For stress relief and relaxtion.
  • A History of Nursing explores the history of nursing by investigating the earliest records of the caring profession, how it progressed and what established it along the way to becoming the nursing we see today. It starts at the beginning of the story -? how, once upon a time, all we had to depend on was Mother Nature. Over time, education and standards improved for the safety, development and governance of the profession. Not everything was plain sailing and the book introduces lesser-known people who made this possible, sometimes at great cost to themselves, and the effect military nursing had on the nineteenth century in turning nursing from religious principles to the secular standards we see today. How did nursing go from being knowledge handed down through ancient scripts, folklore and sometimes by accident, to the degree-level, accountable practice of modern times? And why do nurses not wear hats anymore? A History of Nursing answers all these questions and more.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Florence Nightingale is known as 'The Lady with the Lamp', who travelled to Scutari to nurse the soldiers fighting in the Crimean War. But she stayed there less than two years, she spent more than half her life in London, and she lived until the age of 90. So, what else did she do, and where else did she go? Why did Florence's father change his name to Nightingale? Who found Athena the Owl in Mayfair? How many nurses went with Florence to Scutari? Was Florence married? Where did Florence buy her perfume? Did Florence ever go to India? What and where is the Nightingale Jewel? With this book you will be able to discover the answers to these questions and many more.
  • Sale!
    This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
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