• No sleep for twenty hours. No food for ten. And a ward full of soon-to-be mothers... Midwives are there for us at some of the most challenging, empowering and defining moments of our lives. From heart-wrenching grief to the pure joy of a new-born baby, midwife Leah Hazard has seen it all. But life on the NHS front line, working within a system at breaking point, is more extreme than you could ever imagine. Moving and compassionate, funny and unexpected, Leah shares her experiences in this extraordinary love letter to new mothers and fellow midwives everywhere.
  • This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • We are delighted to officially launch this definitive guide of the life and ground-breaking achievements of arguably one of the most famous nurses in history, Florence Nightingale. This guide is a joint venture between the Florence Nightingale Museum and the Florence Nightingale Foundation, which is all the more poignant as this year is the bicentenary of Florence Nightingale's birth. To mark this very special anniversary, the World Health Organization have designated 2020 as Year of the Nurse and Midwife and this guide is the perfect opportunity for us to celebrate the career of such as illustrious individual as Florence.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity and its work.
  • Who was Florence Nightingale? And why is she still famous today? When Florence Nightingale was born in 1820, women from wealthy families did not become nurses, or take up any other paid work. Yet Florence was determined to DO something with her life. In the end, her persistence paid off. She was asked to lead a team of nurses to care for wounded soldiers during the Crimean War and became famous for her work. Despite years of illness after the war, she used her fame to campaign for changes in all sorts of areas. Two hundred years later, this biography explores Florence's life and achievements - from her ideas about nursing and the importance of healthcare for all, to her emphasis on the power of data and statistics to reveal the reasons why changes should be made. Her story is illustrated with fascinating objects and photographs from her life, many of them held by the Florence Nightingale Museum. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Nurses and nursing are firmly rooted in Britain's heritage, for the profession as we know it today owes much to the pioneering work of Florence Nightingale. Before she helped the establish the first nurse training school in Liverpool in the late 1800s, the women who looked after the sick were a motley mix. The role of the nurse has developed from the untrained handywoman and private nurse, through the early nurses who acted as 'health missioners', to the highly trained professionals we recognise today. Nurse training has evolved to reflect the advances in medical treatment and nurses have been able to engage more widely with the community by undergoing additional training as, for example, district nurse, school nurses, midwives, health visitors and mental health nurses. During both world wars, nurses made a special contribution on the home front and overseas. Using first-hand accounts from nurses through the ages, Susan Cohen takes us on a nostalgic journey through the history of nurses and nursing in Britain, from the pre-Nightingale days through to the post-NHS era.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Written by Lucy Lethbridge and illustrated by Karen Donnelly. Born into a wealthy family, Florence Nightingale could have lived a life of leisure and luxury. Instead she longed to be a nurse. In 1830, that was the last thing a rich girl could do - but Florence was no ordinary girl. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Have you ever wondered why history books are full of men? And what women were doing at the time? Women: Our History surveys the lives of women across centuries and continents. It examines the often overlooked roles they played, and brings you face to face with the pioneers and rule-breakers who dared to be different. From warrior queens to astronauts, women?s suffrage to the sexual revolution, this is the other side of history. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Sale!
    "My heart always sinks within me when I hear the good housewife, of every class, say 'I assure you the bed is well slept in': and I can only hope it is not true. What? Is the bed already saturated with somebody else's damp before my patient comes to exhale in it his own damp? Has it not had a single chance to be aired? No, not one.  It has been slept in every night." From the best know work of Florence Nightingale, the originator and founder of modern nursing, comes a collection of notes that played an important part of the much needed revolution in the field of nursing. For the first time it was brought to the attention of those caring for the sick that their responsibilities covered not only the administration of medicines and the application of poultices, but the proper use of fresh air, light, warmth, cleanliness, quiet and the proper selection and administration of diet. Miss Nightingale is outspoken on these subjects as well as on other factors that she considers essential to good nursing. But, whatever her topic, her main concern and attention is always on the patient and his needs. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Crimea

    £12.99
    by Orlando Figes The Crimean War one of the fiercest battles in Russia's history, killing nearly a million men and completely redrawing the map of Europe. Pitting the Tsar's empire against an alliance of Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire, it was the first conflict to use photography, the telegraph and newspapers; a war over territory, from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf; a war of religion, driven by a fervent, populist belief by the Tsar and his ministers that it was Russia's task to rule all Orthodox Christians and control the Holy Land; it was the original 'total war'. Orlando Figes' vivid new book reinterprets this extraordinary conflict. Bringing to life ordinary soldiers in snow-filled trenches, surgeons on the battlefield and the haunted, fanatical figure of Tsar Nicholas himself, Crimea tells the human story of a tragic war. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it's work.
  • From delicate floral notes to crisp citrus bites, gin remains a perennial favourite of cocktail-sippers everywhere. Originally a centuries old medicinal elixir, the brilliantly botanical spirit is much more than tonic's sidekick. Today's gin is sophisticatedly sippable, adding depth and flavour to any drink. This beautifully illustrated book will introduce you to a host of cocktails, from the classic to the cutting edge, showcasing the versatile potential of gin. In Gin Made Me Do It, gin aficionado and cocktail maven Jassy Davis explains everything you need to know: how to choose the right type, mix the ultimate martini and deliver delicious cocktails for every occasion. Add elegance to your evenings with the perfect G&T or an updated classic like the Aviation or Vesper, or if you're feeling adventurous, sip on Yuzu Sours, Shooting Stars, Salty Sea Dogs and many more gin-spirational treats. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Where can you find monsters in Trafalgar Square? Whatever happened to Bedlam? Where can you praise God, buy meatballs and have a sauna? What?s in the House of Dreams? To which secret society does Prince Charles belong? What?s the trick to instant weight loss? Secret London: An Unusual Guide?is the original and still the best of all the many alternative London guides: accept no imitation. Authors Rachel Howard and Bill Nash have prowled the city streets, seeking out the hidden, eccentric and overlooked. Now the definitive insider?s guide to London has been fully updated, with over 40 new entries and a brand new look. Far from the crowds and the usual cliches, London still reserves any number of hidden treasures for those who know how to wander off the beaten track.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Is Medicine Still Good For Us? The sophistication of modern medicine is an exceptional feat in which many of us benefit from unpredcidented levels of care. Yet medical progress comes at a price: resistance to anti-biotics, ever-mutating superbugs and the unintended yet devasating consequence of prescribing opiates are all part of today's medical landscape. Is the natural human experience being over 'medicalized' as we seek pharmaceutical remedies for every kind of suffering? Are its astronomical costs furthering global inequality? Where has modern medicine failed us and how does it need to change? This inclusive volumes interogates the economics and ethics of modern practices and the impact they have on our lives.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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