• Have you ever wondered why history books are full of men? And what women were doing at the time? Women: Our History surveys the lives of women across centuries and continents. It examines the often overlooked roles they played, and brings you face to face with the pioneers and rule-breakers who dared to be different. From warrior queens to astronauts, women?s suffrage to the sexual revolution, this is the other side of history. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Florence Nightingale is one of the most famous figures in modern history. Yet much of what we know of her emanates from unreliable second-hand accounts and from a mid-reading of the primary sources.?Florence Nightingale at First Hand,?by Lynn McDonald, editor of Nightingale?s Collected Works and the world?s foremost Nightingale authority, aims to put this right. This is a book that reports what Florence Nightingale said and did, based on her writing, of which a massive amount survives, scattered in over two hundred archives throughout the world. Published to commemorate the centenary of Nightingale?s death, McDonald?s study presents a Florence Nightingale for the twenty-first century, as an author of great style and wit, a systems thinker and pioneering public health reformer - the heroine and nurse were only the start.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
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    This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • Florence Nightingale is known as 'The Lady with the Lamp', who travelled to Scutari to nurse the soldiers fighting in the Crimean War. But she stayed there less than two years, she spent more than half her life in London, and she lived until the age of 90. So, what else did she do, and where else did she go? Why did Florence's father change his name to Nightingale? Who found Athena the Owl in Mayfair? How many nurses went with Florence to Scutari? Was Florence married? Where did Florence buy her perfume? Did Florence ever go to India? What and where is the Nightingale Jewel? With this book you will be able to discover the answers to these questions and many more.
  • The hand of a stranger offered in solace. A flower placed on a dead body as a mark of respect. A gentle word in response to fear and anger. It is these moments of empathy, in the extremis of human experience, that define us as people. Nobody knows this better than a nurse and Molly Case has witnessed countless such moments. In?How to Treat People,?she documents these extraordinary points, when two people truly connect. In rich, lyrical prose, she introduces us to patients with whom we share the pain, but also the experience of illness when life is at its most vivid. And when her father is admitted to the high dependency unit on which she works, Molly confronts care in a whole new way, when two worlds - the professional and the personal - suddenly collide. Weaving together medical history, art, memoir and science,?How to Treat People?beautifully illustrates the intricacies of the human condition and the oscillating rhythms of life and death. Most of all, it is the heart-stopping reminder that we can all find meaning in being part, even for a moment, of the lives of others.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • A History of Nursing explores the history of nursing by investigating the earliest records of the caring profession, how it progressed and what established it along the way to becoming the nursing we see today. It starts at the beginning of the story -? how, once upon a time, all we had to depend on was Mother Nature. Over time, education and standards improved for the safety, development and governance of the profession. Not everything was plain sailing and the book introduces lesser-known people who made this possible, sometimes at great cost to themselves, and the effect military nursing had on the nineteenth century in turning nursing from religious principles to the secular standards we see today. How did nursing go from being knowledge handed down through ancient scripts, folklore and sometimes by accident, to the degree-level, accountable practice of modern times? And why do nurses not wear hats anymore? A History of Nursing answers all these questions and more.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • A humorous, snarky & unique adult colouring book for registered nurses, nurse practitioners and nursing students. For stress relief and relaxtion.
  • Crimea

    £12.99
    by Orlando Figes The Crimean War one of the fiercest battles in Russia's history, killing nearly a million men and completely redrawing the map of Europe. Pitting the Tsar's empire against an alliance of Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire, it was the first conflict to use photography, the telegraph and newspapers; a war over territory, from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf; a war of religion, driven by a fervent, populist belief by the Tsar and his ministers that it was Russia's task to rule all Orthodox Christians and control the Holy Land; it was the original 'total war'. Orlando Figes' vivid new book reinterprets this extraordinary conflict. Bringing to life ordinary soldiers in snow-filled trenches, surgeons on the battlefield and the haunted, fanatical figure of Tsar Nicholas himself, Crimea tells the human story of a tragic war. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it's work.
  • Comprehensive biography about Florence, written by Mark Bostridge
  • Is Medicine Still Good For Us? The sophistication of modern medicine is an exceptional feat in which many of us benefit from unpredcidented levels of care. Yet medical progress comes at a price: resistance to anti-biotics, ever-mutating superbugs and the unintended yet devasating consequence of prescribing opiates are all part of today's medical landscape. Is the natural human experience being over 'medicalized' as we seek pharmaceutical remedies for every kind of suffering? Are its astronomical costs furthering global inequality? Where has modern medicine failed us and how does it need to change? This inclusive volumes interogates the economics and ethics of modern practices and the impact they have on our lives.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Meet Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. Growing up in an upper-class family, it was expected that Florence would find a husband and live a life of luxury—but that kind of life wasn’t for her. Her calling was caring for the sick and the poor, so she followed her passion with her whole heart and trained to be a nurse. When war broke out, Florence travelled to nurse wounded soldiers but found that the hospitals were so dirty that they were making people ill! This experience inspired her to lead a healthcare revolution, and she became the mother of modern nursing, introducing care practices still followed today. This inspiring book features stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, including a biographical timeline with historical photos and a detailed profile of the social reformer’s life.
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