• We are delighted to officially launch this definitive guide of the life and ground-breaking achievements of arguably one of the most famous nurses in history, Florence Nightingale. This guide is a joint venture between the Florence Nightingale Museum and the Florence Nightingale Foundation, which is all the more poignant as this year is the bicentenary of Florence Nightingale's birth. To mark this very special anniversary, the World Health Organization have designated 2020 as Year of the Nurse and Midwife and this guide is the perfect opportunity for us to celebrate the career of such as illustrious individual as Florence.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity and its work.
  • No sleep for twenty hours. No food for ten. And a ward full of soon-to-be mothers... Midwives are there for us at some of the most challenging, empowering and defining moments of our lives. From heart-wrenching grief to the pure joy of a new-born baby, midwife Leah Hazard has seen it all. But life on the NHS front line, working within a system at breaking point, is more extreme than you could ever imagine. Moving and compassionate, funny and unexpected, Leah shares her experiences in this extraordinary love letter to new mothers and fellow midwives everywhere.
  • Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical text on hospitals - featuring a foreword by the Florence Nightingale Museum - Nightingale reveals her passion for good hospital architecture and design. At Scutari she saw first hand the harm which can be caused by inadequate and poorly-designed hospital buildings. Nightingale openly criticised designs which she thought might lead to higher infection rates, and therefore patients deaths, Florence Nightingale, keen to increase the range of employment open to women, spent time visiting hospitals in Europe, studying their methods of training nurses, before she was herself trained at Kaiserswerth in 1851. During the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale's quiet determination in tackling the problems in the face of a deep-rooted military establishment, as well as her understanding of the spiritual and physical needs of the wounded soldiers and their families, won her great acclaim and an international reputation as 'The Lady with the Lamp'. Reports of Florence Nightingale's findings and suggestions had a profound effect on the medical community and re-established her as an international healthcare authority. Published in conjunction with the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work. 
  • Pre-order now for shipping on 12th May Order the new editions of Notes on Nursing and Notes on Hospitals in May and get a free copy of Hospital in the Oatfield In this classic historical nursing text, first published in 1859, Nightingale wrote '...nothing but observation and experience will teach us the ways to maintain or to bring back the state of health'. The guidance Nightingale wrote of includes such practicalities as ventilation, heating, noise, light, bedding and the cleanliness of the patient's environment, as well as a nurse's personal cleanliness and methods of observation. The pioneering work of Florence Nightingale and her effort to structure the care of the unwell has since earned her recognition as one of the world's founders of modern nursing. Over 160 years later, the observations of the sick by Florence Nightingale are astonishingly similar, which is why Notes on Nursing is as practical as it is captivating. Whether you are a student nurse or experienced nurse, or simply caring for the infirm, this book stands the test of time and maintains its innovativeness. Florence is remembered as the founder of modern nursing, but she was so much more; a female icon in her own lifetime, a healthcare pioneer, an influential statistician, a trailblazer and a leader. And her legacy still lives on today. Published in conjunction with - and including a foreword by - the Florence Nightingale Museum.   All shop sales support the work of the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.   
  • This book presents fresh analyses of unpublished, published and significant primary source material relevant to the medical aspects on the Eastern campaign of 1854-1856 – commonly called the Crimean War. The aim has been to produce an account based on robust evidence. The project began with no preconceptions but came to seriously question the contributions made by the talented and well-connected Florence Nightingale and the suitably-qualified Sanitary Commissioners. The latter had been sent by the government to investigate matters on the spot. This may prove an unexpected and possibly unsympathetic conclusion for some of Nightingale’s many admirers. Rigorously weighing the evidence, it is unmistakeably clear that there is very little proof that Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners significantly influenced the improvement in the health of the main Army in the Crimea. The principal problems were at the front, not in Turkey, and it was there that matters were gradually rectified, with the health of the troops beginning to improve during the early weeks of 1855. The historiography of the campaign has tended to concentrate on the catastrophic deterioration in the health of the Army during the first winter and the perceived incompetence of the heads of department. The contributions made by Nightingale and the Sanitary Commissioners have been greatly over-emphasised. As a consequence, the medical aspects of the war have been inaccurately portrayed in both academic works and popular culture. The author’s analyses should alter existing preconceptions or prejudices about what happened in Crimea and Turkey during those fateful war years. The ‘Victory over Disease’ took place in the Crimea, and not at Scutari – and this was not due to the contributions of any one person, or even a group of individuals. Rather it represented the involvement of many people in many walks of life who worked, possibly unwittingly, for a common purpose, and with such a gratifying result.
  • A History of Nursing explores the history of nursing by investigating the earliest records of the caring profession, how it progressed and what established it along the way to becoming the nursing we see today. It starts at the beginning of the story -? how, once upon a time, all we had to depend on was Mother Nature. Over time, education and standards improved for the safety, development and governance of the profession. Not everything was plain sailing and the book introduces lesser-known people who made this possible, sometimes at great cost to themselves, and the effect military nursing had on the nineteenth century in turning nursing from religious principles to the secular standards we see today. How did nursing go from being knowledge handed down through ancient scripts, folklore and sometimes by accident, to the degree-level, accountable practice of modern times? And why do nurses not wear hats anymore? A History of Nursing answers all these questions and more.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Edited by Ruth Cown and foreword by Michael Morpurgo. Edith Appleton, known as Edie, was working as a professional nurse when war broke out in 1914. She immediately joined the military nursing services and spent the next four years treating dying and injured allied soldiers in France and Belgium, as they fought an entirely new type of war: one of horrendous living conditions, gas attacks and shell-shocked survivors. A Nurse at the Front contains the fascinating diaries Edie kept of her experiences. Surrounded by death, she never lost her appreciation of life. Against the background of Ypres and the Somme, Edie writes unflinchingly, with clarity and even wit. We see the Great War through a new set of eyes in an acutely observed, courageous account of life on the front line of treacherous warfare.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it?s work.
  • Life in London's East End in the 1950s was tough. The brothels of Cable Street, the Kray brothers and gang warfare, the meths drinkers in the bombsites- this was the world Jennifer Worth entered when she became a midwife at the age of twenty-two. Babies were born in slum conditions, often with no running water. Funny, disturbing and moving, Call the Midwife brings to life a world that has now changed beyond measure.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its works.
  • Crimea

    £12.99
    by Orlando Figes The Crimean War one of the fiercest battles in Russia's history, killing nearly a million men and completely redrawing the map of Europe. Pitting the Tsar's empire against an alliance of Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire, it was the first conflict to use photography, the telegraph and newspapers; a war over territory, from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf; a war of religion, driven by a fervent, populist belief by the Tsar and his ministers that it was Russia's task to rule all Orthodox Christians and control the Holy Land; it was the original 'total war'. Orlando Figes' vivid new book reinterprets this extraordinary conflict. Bringing to life ordinary soldiers in snow-filled trenches, surgeons on the battlefield and the haunted, fanatical figure of Tsar Nicholas himself, Crimea tells the human story of a tragic war. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and it's work.
  • Written by Lucy Lethbridge and illustrated by Karen Donnelly. Born into a wealthy family, Florence Nightingale could have lived a life of leisure and luxury. Instead she longed to be a nurse. In 1830, that was the last thing a rich girl could do - but Florence was no ordinary girl. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Florence Nightingale is one of the most famous figures in modern history. Yet much of what we know of her emanates from unreliable second-hand accounts and from a mid-reading of the primary sources.?Florence Nightingale at First Hand,?by Lynn McDonald, editor of Nightingale?s Collected Works and the world?s foremost Nightingale authority, aims to put this right. This is a book that reports what Florence Nightingale said and did, based on her writing, of which a massive amount survives, scattered in over two hundred archives throughout the world. Published to commemorate the centenary of Nightingale?s death, McDonald?s study presents a Florence Nightingale for the twenty-first century, as an author of great style and wit, a systems thinker and pioneering public health reformer - the heroine and nurse were only the start.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Comprehensive biography about Florence, written by Mark Bostridge
  • Sale!
    A guide to Florence's life and work by Kirsteen Nixon.
  • Paperback edition of Florence Nightingale: A Very Brief History by Lynn McDonald
  • Who was Florence Nightingale? And why is she still famous today? When Florence Nightingale was born in 1820, women from wealthy families did not become nurses, or take up any other paid work. Yet Florence was determined to DO something with her life. In the end, her persistence paid off. She was asked to lead a team of nurses to care for wounded soldiers during the Crimean War and became famous for her work. Despite years of illness after the war, she used her fame to campaign for changes in all sorts of areas. Two hundred years later, this biography explores Florence's life and achievements - from her ideas about nursing and the importance of healthcare for all, to her emphasis on the power of data and statistics to reveal the reasons why changes should be made. Her story is illustrated with fascinating objects and photographs from her life, many of them held by the Florence Nightingale Museum. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • From delicate floral notes to crisp citrus bites, gin remains a perennial favourite of cocktail-sippers everywhere. Originally a centuries old medicinal elixir, the brilliantly botanical spirit is much more than tonic's sidekick. Today's gin is sophisticatedly sippable, adding depth and flavour to any drink. This beautifully illustrated book will introduce you to a host of cocktails, from the classic to the cutting edge, showcasing the versatile potential of gin. In Gin Made Me Do It, gin aficionado and cocktail maven Jassy Davis explains everything you need to know: how to choose the right type, mix the ultimate martini and deliver delicious cocktails for every occasion. Add elegance to your evenings with the perfect G&T or an updated classic like the Aviation or Vesper, or if you're feeling adventurous, sip on Yuzu Sours, Shooting Stars, Salty Sea Dogs and many more gin-spirational treats. All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • A lasting memory of your visit to the Florence Nightingale or a taster before you visit!
  • Illustrated extensively throughout with contemporary art and photographs
  • The hand of a stranger offered in solace. A flower placed on a dead body as a mark of respect. A gentle word in response to fear and anger. It is these moments of empathy, in the extremis of human experience, that define us as people. Nobody knows this better than a nurse and Molly Case has witnessed countless such moments. In?How to Treat People,?she documents these extraordinary points, when two people truly connect. In rich, lyrical prose, she introduces us to patients with whom we share the pain, but also the experience of illness when life is at its most vivid. And when her father is admitted to the high dependency unit on which she works, Molly confronts care in a whole new way, when two worlds - the professional and the personal - suddenly collide. Weaving together medical history, art, memoir and science,?How to Treat People?beautifully illustrates the intricacies of the human condition and the oscillating rhythms of life and death. Most of all, it is the heart-stopping reminder that we can all find meaning in being part, even for a moment, of the lives of others.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.?
  • Do you hesitate about putting forward ideas? Are you reluctant to claim credit for your achievements? Do you find it difficult to get the support you need from your boss or the recognition you deserve from your colleagues? If your answer to any of these is 'yes', How Women Rise will help you get back on track. Inspiring and practical by turns, it identifies twelve common habits that can prove an obstacle to future success and tells you how to overcome them. In the process, it points the way to a career that will satisfy your ambitions and help you make the difference you want to make in the world.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • From the medicine we take to the cars we drive, the clothes we wear adn even the beer we drink, statistics hae given shape to the world we inhabit. However, for the media, statistics are routinely 'damning', 'horrifying' or, occasionally, 'encouraging'. Exploring the history, mathematics, philosophy and practical use of statistics, Eillen Magnello - with the help of Borin Van Loon's deft illustration - traces the rise of statistics from the ancient Babylonians, Egyptians and Chinese, to the censuses of the Romans and the Greeks, and the modern emergence of the term itself in Europe. They explore the English Victorians such ass William Farr who created the modern discipline of vital statistics, and Francis Galton, W. F. R. Weldon and Karl Pearson who established the fundamentally different modern discipline of mathematical statistics. Introducing Statistics is an enjoyable, suprise-filled tour through a subject that is both fascinating, and crucial to understanding our world.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Is Medicine Still Good For Us? The sophistication of modern medicine is an exceptional feat in which many of us benefit from unpredcidented levels of care. Yet medical progress comes at a price: resistance to anti-biotics, ever-mutating superbugs and the unintended yet devasating consequence of prescribing opiates are all part of today's medical landscape. Is the natural human experience being over 'medicalized' as we seek pharmaceutical remedies for every kind of suffering? Are its astronomical costs furthering global inequality? Where has modern medicine failed us and how does it need to change? This inclusive volumes interogates the economics and ethics of modern practices and the impact they have on our lives.   All shop sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
  • Little Black Book: A Toolkit for Working Women is the modern ?career guide every creative woman needs, whether you?re just starting out or already have years of experience. Full of fresh ideas and no-nonsense practical advice, Otegha Uwagba takes you through everything you need to build a successful self-made career: from money management to building a killer brand, via a crash course in networking like a pro and tips on overcoming creative block. With contributions from trailblazing creative women- including acclaimed author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Refinery29 co-founder Piera Gelardi, The Gentlewoman?s Penny Martin and many more- Little Black Book is a curation of essential wisdom and hard-won career insights. Whether you?re a thinker, a maker, an artist or an entrepreneur, you?ll find inspiration for your working life here.   All ship sales support the Florence Nightingale Museum, a registered charity, and its work.
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